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June 17, 2011

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Bob

I remain intrigued by whether meaning is a necessary part of art and whether we might, at least sometimes, be led astray in seeking 'the' meaning of a piece of art rather than using it as an inspirational starting point. If we only uncover the 'real' meaning of the art by reading what the artist has to say about it, then does the role of the art itself simply become one similar to a rhetorical device in speech - making the message somehow more palatable or convincing? Anish Kapoor has, I think, said that [some of] his art does not have meaning and indeed is designed to confound meaning http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-11868762 nonetheless he is regarded as an influential artist.

nigel warburton

Thanks very much for this Bob. Interesting point about Kapoor's alleged intention that his work have no intended meaning...There is more about the question of artists' intentions and interpretation of works of art here: http://tinyurl.com/6kw94z8 (from a previous Tate Modern course). I'll edit the post above and put the link in there too.

modern canvas

Really interesting post, also thank you for the decent comments. I can see where you're coming from though!

landscape wall art

Contextual information aids the reading of the actual causes - in the case of Simon Norfolk's group portraits they are great canvas prints!

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